No hair there

The Greek goddesses of Lestrygonians, who sup on ambrosia ("drinking electricity") and thus may not need an anus, return in Circe as the ostensibly asexual Nymph who judges Bloom's carnal transgressions: "We immortals, as you saw today, have not such a place and no hair there either. We are stone cold and pure. We eat electric light." The Nymph's words suggest that when Bloom inspected a statue in the National Museum his theory about anal orifices was confirmed and a new thought entered his mind: goddesses have no pubic hair. This may echo one of the celebrated curiosities of Victorian culture, John Ruskin's disastrous aestheticizing of the female midsection.

JH 2020

 4th century BCE torso of Aphrodite in the style of Praxiteles, held in the Louvre, Paris. Source: www.louvre.fr.

 Albumen carte-de-visite (visiting-card size) photographic portrait of John Ruskin made in 1863 by W. & D. Downey, held in the National Portrait Gallery, London. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

 Thomas Richmond's 1851 oil on board portrait of Euphemia (Effie) Gray, held in the National Portrait Gallery, London. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Daniel Chester French's sculpture of Andromeda (chains fettering the left wrist are not seen from this angle), displayed at Chesterwood in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. Source: www.pinterest.com.