Ecce homo

In Lotus Eaters, a chapter in which Bloom yearns for palliatives to relieve his sexual anguish, he finds a lazily reclining Buddha more appealing than the Christian god of bloody tortures: "Not like Ecce Homo. Crown of thorns and cross." The story of Christ's thorns and cross, told in the biblical gospels, was represented in a trilogy of paintings by a late 19th century Hungarian artist, one of which, Ecce Homo, was displayed in Dublin and inspired Joyce to write an admiring essay. Several paragraphs later in Lotus Eaters, thoughts of Christ on the cross return when Bloom thinks of the Catholic acronyms "I.N.R.I." and "I.H.S."

JH 2019

  Source: everlastingchoice.com.

A Christian tattoo. Source: www.beliefnet.com.

Ecce Homo, 1896 oil on canvas painting by Mihály Munkácsy, held in the Déri Museum, Debrecen, Hungary. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Golgotha, 1884 oil on canvas painting by Mihály Munkácsy, held in the Déri Museum, Debrecen, Hungary. The letters INRI can be seen at the top of Christ's cross. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Jesuit device of IHS motto beside a cross and nails within a circle of flames, embroidered on a priest's stole. Source: www.christianexpressions.com.