Put us all into it

When Myles Crawford, in Aeolus, tries to interest Stephen in writing something for the press, he suggests that he could "Put us all into it." When Bloom thinks in Eumaeus of writing something for a newspaper as Philip Beaufoy has done, he thinks of presenting "a miniature cameo of the world we live in." Both journalistic moments predict the great novel that Joyce unveiled in 1922: a fiction that would give not only an encyclopedic account of human life but also a densely specific recreation of 1904 Dublin and its people. 

JH 2020

A Bird's Eye View of Dublin, drawn in 1890 by W. H. Brewer and first published in the Illustrated London News. Source: jamartprints.com.

2012 photograph by Remca, taken from a point slightly farther south. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

O'Connell Bridge and Sackville Street ca. 1890, in a photograph held in the National Library of Ireland. Source: twistedsifter.com.

Sackville Street ca. 1905, in a photograph held in the National Library of Ireland. Source: twistedsifter.com.

Joseph Frank, The Idea of Spatial Form in Modern Literature (1945). Source: www.goodreads.com.